California, Let's Not Make an Uber Mistake with Homemade Food!

Join us in telling Sacramento that AB 626 puts the interests of Big Tech above the interests of home cooks.

Background

In 2012, the Law Center worked alongside allies and food movement leaders to pass the California Homemade Food Act. We are passionate about legalizing homemade food sales and providing increased opportunities for local food production and sales, especially for low-income entrepreneurs who don’t have the resources to access expensive commercial kitchens. In 2017, a bill AB 626, was introduced in the California Legislature to expand the types of homemade foods allowed to be sold in California, especially hot meals. But the bill is sponsored by a for-profit, venture capital backed tech company whose app (illegally) sells home cooked hot meals. The bill has been moving through the State Legislature in Sacramento, continually being amended to benefit tech platform owners and their investors while leaving out the people who create the value for the tech companies: the home cooks!

After many conversations with stakeholders from around California, we’ve decided that we cannot support the current homemade food legislation. The "gig economy" has shown itself to "disrupt" industries for the primary benefit of investors and outside shareholders, leaving workers behind. The current homemade food legislation has been written under the direction of tech company executives and lobbyists to meet the needs of web app developers and their investors. We see harmful consequences for workers and public safety in this newest version of Silicon Valley disruption. But we have a better policy proposal for California: one that would expand opportunities for home cooks to operate lawful businesses, while curbing the powers of Big Tech in the food system (see links below for details).

This is a crossroads moment for the food movement: Will homemade food be taken over by the likes of Uber and Amazon, or will it build on the success of community-driven institutions like farmers’ markets and worker cooperatives? Help bring home cooks back to the negotiating table.

 

Our Policy Proposal: Download our summary proposal (2 page pdf). Download our full policy proposal (6 page pdf).

Op Ed: Read our op ed in the Summer 2017 edition of Edible East Bay here.

Take Action! Find out how you can support these efforts in small and big ways.

 

From our Food News Blog:

 

But What's Legal Now? Looking for information on the current "Cottage Food Law" or Homemade Food Act that you can use to start a home-based food business in California now? Click here.

 

 

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